June 29, 2012

Clippings: The Land of Make Believe

We had this print, too, growing up (above). It hung upstairs--the kid's floor--and I would stare at it re-tracing every bit of path. I remember trying to puzzle out how deep a bottomless lake is, and thinking that (how do I say this?) it really actually was bottomless in reality--that that drawing was somehow, magically, a real bottomless lake, and then I tried to puzzle out how deep a bottomless lake would be. Isn't it incredible looking back on those points where imagination and reality are completely intertwined. Mom and Dad recently restored the poster, framed it and put it up in the new house. (via Alexis' Napa for the Curious and Eccentric)

It all started with pound-cake: This is one of the loveliest stories I've read in a while. (Huffington Post)

Did you know that there are more nano-planets besides Pluto? And they all have really dumb names. One more reason why Pluto's rightful place is with his fellow Greek-god named planets. This infographic is full of similar fascinating information. (Daily Infographic)

The History of the Espresso Machine (Smithsonian Magazine)

Tuck Everlasting came in at #16 in the Top Children's Novels - a fitting place for this profound and compelling meditation on life and death and childhood. The review is quite good, too.  If you haven't read this novel, I think it's high time you do so.  (School Library Journal)

Picturing the Summer Solstice: artworks of summer. I meant to share this last week. (Lines and Colors)

Ok. I'll move here with you. (Remodelista)

"J.D. Salinger was the entertainment director on a Swedish luxury liner" and 23 other jobs of famous writers. (Mental Floss)

I had the pleasure of meeting Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams during the Fancy Food Show last week (more on that anon!), and had a bite of her $6 ice cream sandwiches. Guys. I would pay $10 for them, they are that good. Anyway, she did a week-in-the-life article that is great fun. "It's only healthy if you think mindlessly eating forgettable food is healthy." And "There are many kids that I have seen grow up in the market...I love that they are all super smarty pants, adventuresome people now. I would like to think that I played a small role in that... They certainly played a big role in my development as an ice cream maker."  And "We get together at least once a month for a company-wide meal. It all started 10 years ago at my home table, I would make a gigantic platter of fresh tomato pasta and invite all the kids from the shop over. Back then we could all fit around the table. Now, we have 300 employees...We fill our plates and life stops for a moment and we eat together -- conspire together."  I want my own business to be just like that. Her cookbook, by the way, is by far the best make-at-home ice-cream cookbook I've ever used. (Huffington Post)

Speaking of Artisanal: this is a fascinating discussion and just critique of the word "artisanal" in the food industry today. Going to have to write more about this next week. (SF Weekly)


Leah Libresco, that atheist blogger who is becoming Catholic, and has been all over the news recently, has a great post on prayer. (Patheos)

Hollah! SunDeVich is featured in this month's Food and Wine.

I'm on a hunt for these Southern-brewed Summer Beers. (Garden & Gun)

Finally: The Venerable Sheen! Plus, pray for his cause. (Deacon's Bench)

2 comments:

  1. Dad says he did the exact same thing with the bottomless lake.

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  2. Thanks for the links! I especially enjoyed the Top 100 Children's Novels link... I was glad to see that so many of my favorites were on there, and the many that I haven't read/heard about make me want to camp out in a library and catch up on those!

    Do you like Bridge to Terabithia? I can't remember if you have commented on it here. If so, did you know that it has a deep connection to Takoma Park? I would often think about the book and the Takoma Park girl and boy who inspired it as I was jogging through the Sligo Creek park. I love as an adult learning more about the backgrounds for the books and authors that influenced me so much as a child!

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